This thesis explores the fields of Biopolitics and Architecture, which overlap in the notion of the camp. Camps are multifaceted and come in many forms, but all are founded on the same principal of a bounded and controlled space of exclusion.    
       
     
 This project aims to rearticulate and experiment on the zones of exclusion that are emerging in the contemporary city, by highlighting and exposing the camp as the dominant form of spatial production of the modern city. 
       
     
 It is a precognition of the city of the 21th century, the city as a splintered urban landscape made of premium enclaves and exclaves of intensifying marginality.
       
     
 The city will become a landscape divided by urban boundaries, that separate premium enclaves from exclaves of intensifying marginality. A place where residents will no longer experience the urban territory as a continuum, but will conduct their everyday lives in completely separate socioeconomic and spatial systems. It is a precognition of the city of the 21th century, the city as a maze of camps.
       
     
 The city today, is corralled by spaces of exclusion, ranging from slums to refugee camps. But also by spaces of selective inclusion, ranging from shopping malls to gated communities. According to the philosopher Agamben, all of these configurations can be designated as camps, as the camp is even becoming the dominant form of spatial production.
       
     
 The city will become a landscape divided by urban boundaries, that separate premium enclaves from exclaves of intensifying marginality. A place where residents will no longer experience the urban territory as a continuum, but will conduct their everyday lives in completely separate socioeconomic and spatial systems. 
       
     
 In large zones in many European cities is shopping infiltrating, colonising an even completely replacing every other aspect of urban life. These zones, are controlled by various forms of surveillance and increasingly invested to keep out the “wrong” crowd, and only target the most “profitable”. These zones almost start to function like internalised highly regulated shopping malls.
       
     
8. Shopping Mall Sector Boundary.jpg
       
     
 In certain areas, tourist attractions are so numerous that they push out urban life from its vicinity. These spaces are also heavily controlled, staged and increasingly invested to keep out the “wrong” crowd. These zones almost start to function like theme parks.
       
     
7. Theme Park Sector Boundary.jpg
       
     
 The demise of the public domain is maybe most visible in the rise of privatised domestic estates, often called gated communities. More and more people are choosing to hide behind walls, creating physical barriers to access, and a privatization of public space.
       
     
9. Domestic Estates Sector Boundary.jpg
       
     
 The premium enclaves, can overlap into each other, shopping mall and theme park can have intersecting zones and even highly privatised residential parts can appear as enclaves within a shopping zone. As long as they collectively exclude the less profitable.   Even though some of these enclaves are commendable for the quality of life they offer, their creation directly leads to the creation of its 
       
     
 This thesis explores the fields of Biopolitics and Architecture, which overlap in the notion of the camp. Camps are multifaceted and come in many forms, but all are founded on the same principal of a bounded and controlled space of exclusion.    
       
     

This thesis explores the fields of Biopolitics and Architecture, which overlap in the notion of the camp. Camps are multifaceted and come in many forms, but all are founded on the same principal of a bounded and controlled space of exclusion. 

 

 This project aims to rearticulate and experiment on the zones of exclusion that are emerging in the contemporary city, by highlighting and exposing the camp as the dominant form of spatial production of the modern city. 
       
     

This project aims to rearticulate and experiment on the zones of exclusion that are emerging in the contemporary city, by highlighting and exposing the camp as the dominant form of spatial production of the modern city. 

 It is a precognition of the city of the 21th century, the city as a splintered urban landscape made of premium enclaves and exclaves of intensifying marginality.
       
     

It is a precognition of the city of the 21th century, the city as a splintered urban landscape made of premium enclaves and exclaves of intensifying marginality.

 The city will become a landscape divided by urban boundaries, that separate premium enclaves from exclaves of intensifying marginality. A place where residents will no longer experience the urban territory as a continuum, but will conduct their everyday lives in completely separate socioeconomic and spatial systems. It is a precognition of the city of the 21th century, the city as a maze of camps.
       
     

The city will become a landscape divided by urban boundaries, that separate premium enclaves from exclaves of intensifying marginality. A place where residents will no longer experience the urban territory as a continuum, but will conduct their everyday lives in completely separate socioeconomic and spatial systems. It is a precognition of the city of the 21th century, the city as a maze of camps.

 The city today, is corralled by spaces of exclusion, ranging from slums to refugee camps. But also by spaces of selective inclusion, ranging from shopping malls to gated communities. According to the philosopher Agamben, all of these configurations can be designated as camps, as the camp is even becoming the dominant form of spatial production.
       
     

The city today, is corralled by spaces of exclusion, ranging from slums to refugee camps. But also by spaces of selective inclusion, ranging from shopping malls to gated communities. According to the philosopher Agamben, all of these configurations can be designated as camps, as the camp is even becoming the dominant form of spatial production.

 The city will become a landscape divided by urban boundaries, that separate premium enclaves from exclaves of intensifying marginality. A place where residents will no longer experience the urban territory as a continuum, but will conduct their everyday lives in completely separate socioeconomic and spatial systems. 
       
     

The city will become a landscape divided by urban boundaries, that separate premium enclaves from exclaves of intensifying marginality. A place where residents will no longer experience the urban territory as a continuum, but will conduct their everyday lives in completely separate socioeconomic and spatial systems. 

 In large zones in many European cities is shopping infiltrating, colonising an even completely replacing every other aspect of urban life. These zones, are controlled by various forms of surveillance and increasingly invested to keep out the “wrong” crowd, and only target the most “profitable”. These zones almost start to function like internalised highly regulated shopping malls.
       
     

In large zones in many European cities is shopping infiltrating, colonising an even completely replacing every other aspect of urban life. These zones, are controlled by various forms of surveillance and increasingly invested to keep out the “wrong” crowd, and only target the most “profitable”. These zones almost start to function like internalised highly regulated shopping malls.

8. Shopping Mall Sector Boundary.jpg
       
     
 In certain areas, tourist attractions are so numerous that they push out urban life from its vicinity. These spaces are also heavily controlled, staged and increasingly invested to keep out the “wrong” crowd. These zones almost start to function like theme parks.
       
     

In certain areas, tourist attractions are so numerous that they push out urban life from its vicinity. These spaces are also heavily controlled, staged and increasingly invested to keep out the “wrong” crowd. These zones almost start to function like theme parks.

7. Theme Park Sector Boundary.jpg
       
     
 The demise of the public domain is maybe most visible in the rise of privatised domestic estates, often called gated communities. More and more people are choosing to hide behind walls, creating physical barriers to access, and a privatization of public space.
       
     

The demise of the public domain is maybe most visible in the rise of privatised domestic estates, often called gated communities. More and more people are choosing to hide behind walls, creating physical barriers to access, and a privatization of public space.

9. Domestic Estates Sector Boundary.jpg
       
     
 The premium enclaves, can overlap into each other, shopping mall and theme park can have intersecting zones and even highly privatised residential parts can appear as enclaves within a shopping zone. As long as they collectively exclude the less profitable.   Even though some of these enclaves are commendable for the quality of life they offer, their creation directly leads to the creation of its 
       
     

The premium enclaves, can overlap into each other, shopping mall and theme park can have intersecting zones and even highly privatised residential parts can appear as enclaves within a shopping zone. As long as they collectively exclude the less profitable. 

Even though some of these enclaves are commendable for the quality of life they offer, their creation directly leads to the creation of its